We live in a time of rapid change where our systems and culture are going through major evolutions. Even the way we create and consume art is changing faster than we can process. Who knew, for instance, that CDs would become basically irrelevant someday, thanks to streaming technology?

There are so many new doors open to artists now than ever before – publishing on e-book platforms, whether you have a big-publisher contract or not, making your own musical CDs, recording audio books, creating online classes, digitizing (and mass producing from home) your artwork… We artists are incredibly blessed with these new options for creative expression and distribution.

However, there are iterations of artistic expression that I fear are being pushed further and further to the edge. Reading books – real, paper books – is one of those arts that seems to be wandering dangerously close to the path taken by CDs. (Why read and store a paper book when you can store all your reading materials on an electronic device, or listen to the audiobook, instead?) Letter writing comes to mind. (Who needs letters when we can email and text?) Even the practice of buying original prints seems to be dwindling in favor of mass-produced art.

Copyright: Yancy Lael 2016

Copyright: Yancy Lael 2016

Thankfully, I don’t think any of these “old school” art forms will ever truly disappear, thanks the conscientious people of the world who believe in supporting fellow human beings over corporations. It’s these people who gave us Small Business Saturday, these people who encourage us to visit the locally-owned coffee shop rather than…well, you know where.

Let’s remember a few more ways in which we can support all those who are trying to create more beauty in this world. Do your best to support artists, local or not. Buy original prints, attend art fairs, and share your love of your favorite artists’ work with others.

And of course, some special (and not at all biased) tips for supporting indie writers:

::If the small writers you love are selling their work via Kindle, Nook, or other e-reader services, support it. Oftentimes, this is how indie writers get started because it’s an easy platform to break into. Yeah, it’s digital, but every download helps an indie writer build an audience.

Copyright: Yancy Lael 2016

Copyright: Yancy Lael 2016

::If they have print books, please consider buying the print books. Buy copies as gifts for friends and family, too. It can be extremely challenging to get the word out about indie books – and there is no better way to spread the word than giving the book to others with a personal recommendation.

::Give an honest and clear review of the book. Reviews help enormously, whether it’s for a book, a podcast, or an Etsy shop. It’s okay if you hated the book – just explain why. Don’t give a book 1 star without any explanation.

::Get on your favorite indie authors’ newsletter lists and encourage those you think would enjoy that type of writing to do the same. This makes it so much easier for us to keep in touch and share our work with our devoted readers.

::If your favorite indie author is producing “slow literature,” do your best to support them in some manner. There are a lot of amazing writers, illustrators, and poets out there doing subscription services via the mail – and I mean the mail. Not email. I think this is incredibly original and fun, and it’s important to keep these types of offerings alive.

::Attend local events. It can be challenging for indie authors to put themselves out there. Give them a boost – fill up the room when they promote a reading/signing or other event. Bring some friends and smile a lot from the audience. And buy a book on your way out.

::Consider buying an extra book when you purchase your favorite indie author's latest release and donate the extra copy to the library. Indie publishing doesn't always have the same distribution capabilities, which means it's often harder to find an indie author's books at your local library unless they are donated. 

Let’s keep the art of paper books, storytelling, and intimate readings alive!


Many beloved programs supporting the arts and community service are in danger of being cut (again). If you support the National Endowment for the Arts, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, AmeriCorps, and other such programs, please call your representatives and let them know!

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